Myopain Solutions: Stew’s Blog

NAMTPT Blog Spring 2024: Muscle; The Gripping Story of Strength and Movement by Roy Meals

Stand in a doorway and press the backs of your lowered hands into the frame as if to make it wider. Press for at least 30 seconds, then step away. What happens to your arms? They magically rise weightlessly. This is officially called the Kohnstamm phenomenon, but we don’t really know why. This, and much more is from the new book Muscle by the orthopaedic surgeon Roy Meals, following his previous book Bones: Inside and Out. Its 250pp explore taxonomy, history of muscle anatomy, physiology, deep...

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NAMTPT Blog Winter 2024: Hidden in Plain Sight

Most muscles of the human body were identified and named centuries ago, if not millennia. In the mid-nineties a new muscle named sphenomandibularis was reported. You can figure out where it is by the name. When Stuart Hinds visited us from Australia in 2019 he brought to our attention a muscle called iliocapsularis. I’ve been using his treatment technique for it ever since. The last 2023 edition of the ABMP magazine revealed a muscle that is a new one on me; tensor vastus intermedius (TVI)....

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Connective Issues – Fascia Book Review

A breakthrough book called ‘Fascia – The Tensional Network of the Body’, by Schleip, Findlay, Chaitow and Huijing came out in 2012. A few years later at an NAMTPT conference (2017?) all the attendees were given David Lesondak’s hot-off-the-press book ‘Fascia, What it is and why it matters’. We now had the subject of fascia covered. Leading up to David writing his first edition, over a glass of wine I suggested he write the science in the style of Bill Bryson as when he explained difficult...

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Connective Issues – Feeling like an orphan

This blog is a follow-up to Anne Boone’s excellent summary blog introducing Fascia Research Congress VI in the last mail out. It was so good to be back at a conference for my first time in over three years; reconnecting with old friends and colleagues, and embracing new ones. At Fascia Congress V (2018) we mourned the loss of Leon Chaitow. This time we mourned the loss of Tom Findley MD PhD after a long illness. What a nice man he was. His wife gave a lovely eulogy complete with photos and...

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Connective Issues – Cha cha cha changes (Bowie)

Glaring omission in my last blog. I forgot to mention the fabulous song Oxytocin by Billie Eilish to provide the background music to the blog subject. Just when you think they don’t write songs like the old days a bunch of new artists pop up. Wolf Alice and Phoebe Bridger too. This edition’s blog is about changes; some enforced, some voluntary. Used to be, the first thing I’d do on receipt of my newest JBMT was to asterisk the myofascial trigger point articles reviewed by Jan Dommerholt and...

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Connective Issues — Animal Therapy

Over the years I have really enjoyed learning things from smart people like Shannon Goosen at NAMTPT conferences (I miss those times).  I was very interested in her take on the Braverman test. This survey (see link below) determines our dominant nature according to four chemicals in the body; Dopamine, Acetylcholine, GABA and Serotonin. I, like half the population, am GABA dominant. It can also determine if we’re deficient in any of these. I’m pretty mild. There are tables of chemicals...

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Connective Issues — The Death of Ivan Ilyich

My intended blog was going to be about connective tissue cells called telocytes. This subject got to be too big and I’ve not had time to complete it. Instead, I want to review one of my all-time favourite short stories by Leo Tolstoy. One of my personal strategies for getting through the past two pandemic years has been to read historical novels and non-fiction describing times where people had to put up with a lot worse than we have had to. Subjects have included the plague in times of...

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Connective Issues – Tools of the Trade – Instrument Assistance

Firstly, I would like to say how proud and honoured I am to be included alongside the previous recipients of the David Simon award. It has been reward enough to be able to pass on to whoever is listening (reading) the latest in theoretical research and clinical applications. My workmates say you could kill somebody with the trophy; it’s quite beautiful, and sits prominently on display in my clinic. Last time I brought to your attention two papers both published in October 2021. One was...

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